Freedom of the City of London Admission Papers 1681 – 1925

Freedom of the City of London Admission Papers 1681 – 1925 were launched this week on  http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=2052

I found John CAMPSON admitted on 7th July 1702.  Master’s Name William Brown.  Father’s name George CAMPSON.

Carolul COMPSON admitted 1712 Father’s name Johanis COMPSON .

Edward COMPSON admitted 6 December 1704 Master’s name William VIPER Father’s name Thomas COMPSON

George COMPSON residence county Gloucestershire admission date 9th August 1693 Master’s name Clomout Knap.  Father’s name William Compson.

John COMPSON admission date 7 Aug 1901 father’s name Thomas COMPSON

Jospeh COMPSON admission date 1709 Father’s name Wm COMPSON

William COMPSON residence county Northampton admission date 16 Sep 1715.  Master’s name Timothy Hly father’s name Nathan COMPSON

Wm COMPSON residence county Kent, admission date 6 Apr 1692 Master’s name Richard Collett.  Father’s name Wm COMPSON

This database contains papers associated with application for “Freemen” status. Freeman are: a man who did not have to pay trade taxes and shared in the profits of his borough, a person free of feudal service who had served their apprenticeship and could trade in their own right, and anyone who was a member of a City Guild. Freemen adWhen an individual is granted Freedom papers they are made “Free of the City of London.”

The three meanings of the word Freeman are: a man who did not have to pay trade taxes and shared in the profits of his borough, a person free of feudal service who had served their apprenticeship and could trade in their own right, and anyone who was a member of a City Guild. “Freedom of the Company” meant that a person had earned freemen status within the company or guild and could then apply for Freedom of the City. The tradition of becoming a Freeman is still practiced today and is a point of pride for both men and women though the practical reasons for membership are no longer necessary.

Freedom admission papers can record many biographical details about the individual to whom Freemen status is awarded making this collection of particular interest to genealogists. Many of the documents in this collection are “indentures” or sealed agreements for things like apprenticeship agreements. The original document was made with all copies on the same page of parchment. An “indented” or wavy line was drawn between these copies, which were then cut apart straight through the wavy line. When brought together later these copies could be realigned or “tallied” by matching the indented lines.

Information in this database:

  • Surname
  • Date of indenture
  • Parent or guardian’s name
  • County of residence
  • Master’s nam

Due to the manner in which is these records were organized and preserved, there may be records outside of the year range designated in the archive reference information and the browse.  Some of the above information was taken from:

  • Fitzhugh, Terrick V. H. and Susan Lumas. The Dictionary of Genealogy.

mission papers often contain biographical details about the individual.

 

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About mallerstang

Member of the Guild of One Name Studies researching the name CUMPSTON and its variants. You can see my website at www.cumpston.org.uk I have a new study of the name LAXEN with its own blog at https://laxenresearch.wordpress.com/ and a further research blog which is not registered as a one name study of KNAGGS of Flamborough https://knaggsresearch.wordpress.com/
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