Victorian London – space and place

http://work.axismaps.com/amd/lll/

This map is the first partnership between Adam Matthew Group and Axis Maps LLC exploring both the place and space of Victorian London through historic data and primary source documents. While the words “space” and “place” may be used synonymously, they represent two different sides of this map and two different questions we hope to answer as you use it.

Space, or “Which areas of Victorian London are most similar / different to each other (and how did that change over time)?”

The 19th century was a dynamic time for London and its population and we wanted to let you explore that by the numbers. Organized by Metropolitan Board of Works district, you can see how and where the population of London changed over 100 years. We’ve also included the locations of social institutions throughout London as their locations help us understand how the city tried to cope with the changing nature of its urban population.

Place, or “What was it like to be in Victorian London?”

As London’s population was changing in the 19th century, the city itself was being reshaped. This map contains three different perspectives on the changing city. Historic basemaps not only give you a top-down view of the city; they also allow you to see what aspects of the city cartographers felt were important enough to include on their maps. Original images let you see the important features of the city from a variety of perspectives. Finally, the Tallis Street Views allow you to put yourself on a London street and look around.

 

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About mallerstang

Member of the Guild of One Name Studies researching the name CUMPSTON and its variants. You can see my website at www.cumpston.org.uk I have a new study of the name LAXEN with its own blog at https://laxenresearch.wordpress.com/ and a further research blog which is not registered as a one name study of KNAGGS of Flamborough https://knaggsresearch.wordpress.com/
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