The Assize Court Records of England

The Assize courts were periodic criminal courts. They were active from about 1350 until 1972. These courts were conducted by pairs of judges from the courts at Westminster. The judges worked through circuits which covered most of England

At first, the assizes reviewed certain property disputes, but gradually their jurisdiction expanded to include criminal cases, as well. Over time, these courts became the principal criminal courts in England and Wales, until they were replaced by Crown Courts by the Courts Act 1971.

Most of England was covered by six circuits: Home, Midland, Norfolk, Northern, Oxford, and Western. Beginning in 1340, each circuit had jurisdiction over a group of counties, as follows:

  • Home: Essex, Hertfordshire, Kent, Middlesex, Surrey, and Sussex
  • Midland: Derbyshire, Rutland, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, and Warwickshire
  • Norfolk: Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Huntingdonshire
  • Northern: Cumberland, Northumberland, Westmorland, and Yorkshire
  • Oxford: Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, and Worcestershire
  • Western: Berkshire, Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Hampshire, Oxfordshire, Somerset, and Wiltshire

You can read more about these courts at https://www.familysearch.org/node/1232

 

 

 

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About mallerstang

Member of the Guild of One Name Studies researching the name CUMPSTON and its variants. You can see my website at www.cumpston.org.uk I have a new study of the name LAXEN with its own blog at https://laxenresearch.wordpress.com/ and a further research blog which is not registered as a one name study of KNAGGS of Flamborough https://knaggsresearch.wordpress.com/
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3 Responses to The Assize Court Records of England

  1. Pingback: Quarter Sessions Records of England | cumpstonresearch

  2. Pingback: Parish Map of England | cumpstonresearch

  3. Pingback: Using the FamilySearch Record Collections | cumpstonresearch

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